Author Topic: Sazabi MG  (Read 16217 times)

May 08, 2007, 08:44:28 PM
Read 16217 times

MarkW

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I set a goal for myself to modify and complete a Sazabi in 3 weeks.  Ain't gonna happen.  But, I have made some progress towards my goals.  Here's what I set out to do for structural mods, in no particualr order:

1.  Fix ankle and hips for better posing.  OOB, the guy can basically only stand with feet slightly apart before the soles of the feet come off the table.
2.  Add yellow conductive cables to the upper arm internals.
3.  Replace all cheesy plastic actuators with metal.
4.  LED monoeye & clear monoeye shield.
5.  Detail the hideous blank spots inside the shoulder armor.
6.  Extend the shotgun a bit.

Sculpt wise, the kit is mostly OK.  But there are a few areas I wanted to modify to better match the anime:

7.  Widen the chest armor piece a bit.
8.  Thin/shorten the forearms and pump up the biceps.
9.  Make the outer shoulder armor more curvy.
10.  Add SOME detail to the chest side of the armpit

A few minor detail chops are also on the plate, like cutting out the chest vents, replacing a few joints with stiffer stuff, detailing the head sensor, maybe replacing the oven mitt hands with something better.

So far, I have completed 1 & 3.  7, 8, 9 & 10 are all in progress.  Here's some in progress porn:

Modified ankle ball joint

Modified ankle block (on right)

New ankle actuator

New ankle piece


New ankle pivot


New ankle with armor on





Overall, I'm pretty pleased with the new ankle and hip (hip pictures coming soon).  Compared to what I did with my TallGeese I and 1/144 )8th MST sniper, this is a far more ambitious mod and much more complicated by how bulky the skirt armor is.  Getting this right cost me the most time by far

New forearm

New forearm--ball joint for wrist moved towards center.


The forearm internal is almost entirely a scratchbuild, and the armor sleeve is substantially thinner and rounder.

New upper arm and actuators

Old neck

New neck

Replaced shoulder joint

That's it for now.  Hopefully I'll get the forearms and the forearm armor done this week--I plan to cast copies.  The chest mods should also get done this week.

Then my wife gets back from visiting family, and who knows when I'll get to work on it again...
MarkW

"If we lose the war in the air, we lose the war, and we lose it quickly."
--Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery

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May 08, 2007, 08:54:23 PM
Reply #1

Marc

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Cool I love modified Saz!
The new ankle looks great, as well as the new upper arm.
Promising built, look forward to more!

May 08, 2007, 09:14:31 PM
Reply #2

crazedpanda

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Those are some nice actuators. I've actually been wanting to replace the actuators with metal ones for the MG model I'm currently working on. I tried just painting it at first, but I found the plastic and the paint didn't look quite right (that, and the fact that I had some problems with the paint scraping off due to a tight fit).

However, I was having some problems trying to replace the actuator with a metal piece. The model is the MG God Gundam, and the actuators I replaced with metal are the ones on the legs. I assume other MG models including the Sazabi also have this issue, but I wasn't sure how to handle the issue when the actuator pulls out all the way and then will pull the base of the actuator along with it as it extends. I've seen people replace the actuators with two pieces of aluminum/copper tubing, but I never understood how they would solve the problem of moving the end of the actuator (unless they don't actually move that part).

Since you have such a nice actuator where the plastic base part is still attached, could you explain how you made it (maybe show some extra in-progs of how to make it if it's not too much trouble)?

Thanks again.

May 09, 2007, 02:06:05 AM
Reply #3

MarkW

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I guess I kind of cheated on that part.  What I did for both the arm and ankle actuator was to start with the kit piece--if you look at the "New ankle actuator" picture, the old kit piece is on the left.  I cut off the tubes from the block, leaving only the pivot pegs on the block.  I then drilled out the block where the old tubes were so I could SGT the new tubes onto the block.  If you look closely at the "New ankle pivot" pictures, you can see the upper part of the actuator is fixed at the top exactly where and how the original was.  You can also see in those pics how the smaller actuator rods actually poke a bit into the ankle as the toe would go up.  Since I was drastically moving the end of the actuator rods so they were deeply buried in the foot, I had to create a new anchor point, hence the polycap and rod thing down by the ball joint.  The original kit actuator was situated in such a way that it mechanically made no sense, and had to go. ;)

On the arm I did the same thing, though it was a bit more involved--I'll try to get a pic of it.  In the arm pic, though, you can clearly see the lower pivot block from the kit has basically just had the kit rods cut off and replaced with metal; same goes for the top tubes.  If you can use the original pivot piece(s) from your kit, and cut your tube lengths the same length as the kit, you should be able to essentially just swap out the tubes.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2007, 02:07:56 AM by MarkW »
MarkW

"If we lose the war in the air, we lose the war, and we lose it quickly."
--Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery

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May 09, 2007, 11:35:46 AM
Reply #4

crazedpanda

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Thanks for the info! I realized upon further inspection of your pictures that the smaller rod of the actuator actually goes through the top of the actuator block. I was wondering if this is the only way. To illustrate my point, here are some pictures of the MG God Gundam I'm working on.

Actuator 1

Actuator 2

Actuator 3

Actuator 4

The first two pictures are of the leg in the fully upright position while the last two are when the leg is fully bent (in like a kneeling position). As you can see, the top block actually moves along a groove and only the bottom part is actually fixed. Is there any wat to still do the modification so that the metal cylinders will be able to move AND pull the top block along. Currently, the metal rods that I'm using are from nails that I sawed to length and filed down. They somehow managed to work (they pull the top block down) even though they are not fixed on the top block. I was hoping to find a better method so that I could have full functioning actuators and have them look cool.

Sorry for the thread hi-jack...

May 09, 2007, 05:29:38 PM
Reply #5

MarkW

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Not a hijack at all!  I have the G Gundam, same frame.  Good news is when the armor is on, you can't see the sliding part and what you have will look fine. 

With the armor off, and that whole actuator area where the upper block slides exposed, I'm not sure you have much to work with...it seems to me the sliding block is only pulled due to friction in either case.
MarkW

"If we lose the war in the air, we lose the war, and we lose it quickly."
--Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery

MW Modelwerks


May 10, 2007, 09:47:24 AM
Reply #6

FichtenFoo

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Very nice modifications so far. Three weeks? Yeah, good luck with that! :lol:

May 10, 2007, 04:53:46 PM
Reply #7

MarkW

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Well, I almost could have done it  :D--I'm also in the process of tiling ~300 sq ft of my first floor, where roughly 1 lb of portland cement is required per tile, and mixing enough cement for 50 tiles, laying them and cleanup costs about 4.5 hours.

But I digress!  Here are some more shots.  First up, the hip with the double ball socket mod:


Next, the sides of the chest.  In the original kit, they are shamelessly blank, with either no detail, or shallow molded wrong detail:


The little underarm grill detail is all wrong--it should be straight across, and only have a few blocks.  So, I scratchbuilt a new one--this pic show the components:


And when put together and cleaned up a bit (still needs final sanding):


You can also see in the last image the chest vents were drilled out, the heinous blank was cut out exposing the internal frame a bit and side walls were put in to cover the gap.

One quick note about the camera--I'm using a Casio Exilim with macro and autoflash.  Every shot I take is handheld--no tripod.  Compared to my old standby, the Nikon 995, this little bugger rocks.  You can even see the knit lines on the chest piece.
MarkW

"If we lose the war in the air, we lose the war, and we lose it quickly."
--Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery

MW Modelwerks


May 10, 2007, 05:34:48 PM
Reply #8

Marc

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Looks good! Keep it coming!

May 13, 2007, 05:47:54 PM
Reply #9

MarkW

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Here's the monoeye LED.  It needs a little dressing up and paint, but works fine.  I used SGT and a hollow party stirrer to make a new pivot.  If the whole thing was apart, it'd be a bit ugly.  But, fully assembled it is purty  :D

First, a minor sculpt mod to the helmet--the left side shows the helmet was thinned a bit.  The  chin also got chopped down a bit in profile.


Here's the wiring assembly.  If you look closely, you can see a split on the red party stirrer.  There are two layers--one with the wires inside of it and glued to the wires with SGT, and one split tube around that.  The outer tube was glued on with SGT to the cockpit (wee Char lost a little leg room, but hey, he doesn't come with legs anywho):


Completed helmet (primed):

Note the chin is pointy, like the anime.  My left index finger has suffered from tile and repeated hobby knife strikes.



There is still some alignment to be done, as well as detailing and painting the LED.  You can also see my attempt to detail the camera/sensor thing on the forehead.
MarkW

"If we lose the war in the air, we lose the war, and we lose it quickly."
--Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery

MW Modelwerks


May 14, 2007, 02:14:10 AM
Reply #10

GlauG

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Very nice stuff!  Makes me want to add an LED to mine now, if I ever get round to it. >_>;  My favourite parts thus far are the actuators, though.  Might have to nobble that design to fix some problems I've been having, too.


July 19, 2007, 09:01:32 AM
Reply #11

MarkW

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Quick update here.  Where do I stand on my revised list O' things?
Let's review the checklist:
1. Fix the ankles/legs for posing--DONE
2. Make the shoulder armor more "curvy", but probably not the way you think--DONE
3. Shorten the chest a bit--widened the chest a tad instead, similar effect--DONE
4. Add a mid forearm rotation joint so the big guy can hold his gun up and down for once--NOT DOING
OR
4.5 Move the gun hand polycap away from the forearm arm so it is more centered--DONE

5. Monoeye lighting--DONE
6. Monoeye clear shield--Not sure I'm hot on this anymore
7. BIG one, importance wise--make detailed blanks to cover up the interior of the shoulder armor where there is nothing but an UGLY seam.--DONE
8. Replace any surviving actuator cylinders with metal--DONE
9.  Extend the shotgun a bit--DONE


I made a few detail chops too--like the head camera/sensor thing, making chest vents, swapping out a few verniers if I have better, etc.--DONE

Potential mods:
1. Replace the arm actuator cylinders with anime accurate conductive cable housings (yellow, like the waist belt)--Done, but not as I thought--these are actually on the shoulder, not the arm proper, and grey.
2. Make the hands with bead knuckles, like in HJ--DONE--replaced hands with B-Club hands.
3. MAYBE make a better shoulder joint--NOT DOING
4.  BUT, replace chest side PC joint with stiffer acrylic joint--DONE
5.  Replace all kit thrusters with better detailed/thinner castings--DONE

THINGS I NEVER INTENDED BUT DID ANYWAY (what was I thinking?)!
1. Completely scratchbuilt new forearm, modified elbow joint to be ~1.5mm thinner to fit new forearm--NOT DONE;  I'm going to need to rethink this, and have a solid candidate in mind

Here's what I had, and it looks sucky and is too big.. I was too concerned about keeping the wrist beam sabre gimmick...


2. Completely reshaped forearm armor to be much smaller.--DONE
3. RTV/Resin castings of above--33%; I have the armor shells, but need to mold/cast new elbow & forearm
4. Replaced underarm detail/chest side shoulder joint--DONE
5.  Thicken and detail shield.--75%
6.  Add internal framework to funnel holders--30%

I finished modifying the shoulder skeleton by adding a pair of conductive cables (#1 under potential mods).  Note they are yellow in the early part of the OAV, but grey everywhere later--an error, I'm sure. I'm going grey. Cables were made using crimp beads and some cord. Pics below show the plain shoulder, in progress, and comparison of final product. Looks pretty OK here, and better with primer on.



I also completed the shoulder armor internal frame, and resculpting the outer shoulder armor (#s 2 & 7).







Also completed detailing the blue part of the shield--replaced the plain undercut surface with something a little dressier, and maybe even functional (vents, radiators, beer cooler?)--#5 under things I never intended to do. The gaps between the white and red pieces were easily handled with epoxy putty--more sculptable:



Finally, I added screens to the inside of the chest vents--under detail chops.


More to come shortly...funny how these things take on a life of their own once you start modding.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2007, 09:05:35 AM by MarkW »
MarkW

"If we lose the war in the air, we lose the war, and we lose it quickly."
--Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery

MW Modelwerks


July 19, 2007, 10:12:59 AM
Reply #12

Marc

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Nice job! Love the beads on the shoulders. Good use of textured styrene on the shield!
Do you have a picture of the shoulders, before/after modification?

The thread is getting image heavy, you might wanna put links for the next pics. Other than that, nice and detailed wip!

July 19, 2007, 11:42:24 AM
Reply #13

Identity_Chrisis

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« Last Edit: August 15, 2021, 11:44:56 AM by Identity_Chrisis »

July 19, 2007, 06:36:46 PM
Reply #14

MarkW

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Nice job! Love the beads on the shoulders. Good use of textured styrene on the shield!
Do you have a picture of the shoulders, before/after modification?

The thread is getting image heavy, you might wanna put links for the next pics. Other than that, nice and detailed wip!

Lemme try the linky thing--the images are dragging a bit. 

Did you mena the internal shoulder frame, or external armor?  For the internal frame, I don't have the vanilla shoulder, but this pic shows the in progress mod.  In your mind's eye, strip away all the white styrene along the center plates, and imagine completely blank plastic with an ugly seam running right down the middle.



For the external armor, this is the best comparison:


It is actually a bit more curvy than that--I slightly redid them after that shot.  The other big difference was moving the raised detail things out a bit more--the originals are too far in compared to the anime (where they change size quite radically).
MarkW

"If we lose the war in the air, we lose the war, and we lose it quickly."
--Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery

MW Modelwerks


July 19, 2007, 06:45:55 PM
Reply #15

MarkW

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where do you get the ribbed/ grooved styrene, and what is the official name? i have tried the evergreen styrene website, but it doesn't give you a picture to help you find that stuff.

great job on the sazabi
-identity chrisis

Thanks!  It is Evergreen, and it is their model railroad/construction stuff--I got mine at a train store, if your local area doesn't have a model shop, check the train stores.  That particular one is #4527, "Metal Siding". 0.040" thick.  #4542, "Board and Batten", was the other I considered using.  They also have a clapboard (shingles) pattern that looks like it would be great for Gundam chest vents on a 1/144 kit.  Buying off the web is tough--I really need to see this stuff up close to judge how it will look.  I ended up buying all three, and settling on metal siding only after looking them all over against the kit.  I'm sure I'll use the others--they look pretty neat.

MarkW

"If we lose the war in the air, we lose the war, and we lose it quickly."
--Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery

MW Modelwerks


July 20, 2007, 05:11:29 AM
Reply #16

Mrex-sgundam

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I've been watching this build over at CoM and was wondering where else I could watch it, I'm glad I found it here! I like how this build is coming along. To me small details are what makes a build great! and you have alot of good one. The detail in the sheild, chest vents and eye are the ones that really stand out to me. Can't wait to see the completed ver.
Hey, how's it going?

February 03, 2008, 10:36:27 AM
Reply #17

MarkW

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OK, some updates.  I hope to have this done in one year.  Pray for me...

Until I get the thumbnail stuff worked out on Imageshack, I'll hold off on pics.
I detailed the inside of the shield--actually two attempts. The first, was a disaster when primed.  The new version, primed, is mue bueno.
The elbows and entire forearm have been rebuilt  Much slimmer, and more posable.

Currently working on detailing the one Bit holder interior I plan to have open.  The other will be sealed tighter than Tut's tomb.
« Last Edit: February 03, 2008, 10:37:18 AM by MarkW »
MarkW

"If we lose the war in the air, we lose the war, and we lose it quickly."
--Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery

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February 03, 2008, 02:19:15 PM
Reply #18

MarkW

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Ok some pics:

Shield interior detail, rev 1:


Shield detail, final:


And, while the wife was out, the beam tomahawk (the red plastic pieces from the kit have been significantly reshaped and thinned).  There is a long neo magnet in the handle, so it can be held by the shield (embedded neo as well), and the casting I made for the left hand, which had a neo placed in the mold before I poured the resin.

MarkW

"If we lose the war in the air, we lose the war, and we lose it quickly."
--Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery

MW Modelwerks


February 11, 2008, 10:39:28 AM
Reply #19

MarkW

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Well, major progress over the weekend.  as some of you may recall, this whole project started when my wife went on a 3-week vacation o Okinawa.  Well, with her out of the house for 2 days, and warm enough weather to paint in the garage, I put a decent dent into base coating.

I have almost finsihed the dark pieces and lighter pink--would have been done if the coat didn't get screwed up in dust.  The darker red is about 40% done. 

I'm glad I went with using a reddish brown primer--you can't see in the photos too well, except in the head close up, but there is a nice, subtle pre shade effect.  I do need to be sure to do both leg pieces at the same time to ensure an even coat/tone.

I'm also pretty happy with the pink, I mean salmon, color.  I didn't mix up enough, and was able to reproduce the shade qute easily in the second batch.  The 2nd and 3rd photos show there is a variation, but again, subtle.



MarkW

"If we lose the war in the air, we lose the war, and we lose it quickly."
--Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery

MW Modelwerks